Epoxy Cleaning

Soap and water with a t-shirt type cloth or smooth microfiber cloth are said to still be an extremely effective method for killing/cleaning the virus.

But right now, for safety’s sake, if you want something harsher, something beyond scrubbing thoroughly with soap and water. Then using diluted alcohol or bleach cleaner is what you would have to use.

Bleach:

  • Bleach can be diluted with cold water to make an effective disinfectant against bacteria, fungi and many viruses including coronaviruses. You can typically use ¼ cup of bleach per 1 gallon of cold water – but be sure to follow the directions on the label of your bleach.
  • Make dilute bleach solution as needed and use it within 24 hours, as its disinfecting ability fades with time.
  • Bleach solutions are very hard on the skin, and should not be used as a substitute for handwashing and/or hand sanitizer.

Alcohol:

  • Alcohol in many forms, including rubbing alcohol, can be effective for killing many pathogens. You can dilute alcohol with water (or aloe vera to make hand sanitizer) but be sure to keep an alcohol concentration of around 70% to kill coronaviruses. Many hand sanitizers have a concentration of about 60% alcohol, and Lysol contains about 80%; these are all effective against coronaviruses.
  • Solutions of 70% alcohol should be left on surfaces for 30 seconds (including cellphones – but check the advice of the phone manufacturer to make sure you don’t void the warranty) to ensure they will kill viruses. Pure (100%) alcohol evaporates too quickly for this purpose.
  • Containers of 70% alcohol should be sealed to prevent evaporation. But unlike bleach solutions, they will remain potent as long as they are sealed between uses.
  • A 70% alcohol solution with water will be very harsh on your hands and should not be used as a substitute for handwashing and/or hand sanitizer.

Just be sure the bleach is diluted with water. Over constant cleaning, this may cause the epoxy to lose its gloss. Not right away, but over time. Sometimes in commercial settings, this is a necessary evil.

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